1 min read

ID: 1127538

Short Link: https://gregory-ms.com/articles/1127538/

Discovery Date: 07 December 2022, 15:22:16 UTC

Published Date: 2022-12-07 00:00:00

Source: BioMedCentral

Link: https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-022-03738-4

Manual Selection: true

Machine Learning Gaussian Naive Bayes Model: false

Abstract

jats:titleAbstract</jats:title>jats:pPhotoreceptors (PRs), as the most abundant and light-sensing cells of the neuroretina, are responsible for converting light into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain. PR degeneration, including morphological and functional impairment of these cells, causes significant diminution of the retina’s ability to detect light, with consequent loss of vision. Recent findings in ocular regenerative medicine have opened promising avenues to apply neuroprotective therapy, gene therapy, cell replacement therapy, and visual prostheses to the challenge of restoring vision. However, successful visual restoration in the clinical setting requires application of these therapeutic approaches at the appropriate stage of the retinal degeneration. In this review, firstly, we discuss the mechanisms of PR degeneration by focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death. Subsequently, innovations, recent developments, and promising treatments based on the stage of disorder progression are further explored. Then, the challenges to be addressed before implementation of these therapies in clinical practice are considered. Finally, potential solutions to overcome the current limitations of this growing research area are suggested. Overall, the majority of current treatment modalities are still at an early stage of development and require extensive additional studies, both pre-clinical and clinical, before full restoration of visual function in PR degeneration diseases can be realized.</jats:p> jats:pjats:boldGraphical Abstract</jats:bold></jats:p>

Noun Phrases in Title

  • Potential therapeutic strategies
  • photoreceptor degeneration
  • the path
  • vision
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